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Posts for category: Oral Health

By Dedicated Dental Services, PC
May 17, 2018
Category: Oral Health

The health of your mouth is a vital aspect of your overall health, with things like tooth loss taking a toll on your smile. Luckily, preventingoral health oral issues like tooth decay and gum disease is easy with a routine oral care and good habits.  You can keep your teeth healthy and clean with your at-home routine and the help from your Sparkill, NY dentist at Dedicated Dental Services, Dr. Thomas Williams, serving Sparkill, Old Tappan, Tappan, Blauvelt, Piermont, Nyack, South Nyack, Palisades, Norwood, and Orangeburg, NY.

Tips for Caring For Your Smile

  • Brush and Floss Correctly: Brush your teeth for at least three minutes twice daily. Be sure to use gentle circular motions and minimal force to avoid damaging the oral tissues. Brush the front and back of every tooth, including the last molar. Floss at least once a day, using a new strand of floss for each quadrant of your mouth to cut down on the spread of bacteria throughout the mouth. Carefully slide the floss between each tooth, reaching up and under the gumline to pull plaque and bacteria from the areas your toothbrush bristles cannot reach.
  • Choose the Right Brush: Choose a brush that has soft bristles that are small enough to fit into all the nooks and crannies of your teeth. Avoid oversized brushes as they may not reach into hard-to-reach areas.
  • Keep Your Brush Clean: There is no need to cover your toothbrush. In fact, using a toothbrush cover can harbor bad bacteria and introduce it into your mouth as you brush. Instead, simply rinse your brush after using with water and allow it to air dry.
  • Change Your Brush: As you brush, you will notice that your toothbrush’s bristles begin to become dull and worn. A good rule of thumb is to replace your toothbrush every three to four months.

Routine Dental Examinations and Cleanings in Sparkill, NY

The American Dental Association recommends seeing your dentist twice a year for routine dental exams and professional cleanings performed by a dental hygienist. These visits can stop tooth decay and gum disease in its track and give your teeth a fresh start every six months. Additionally, seeing your dentist regularly helps them find and treat new problems in their earliest, easiest to treat stages.

For more information on keeping good oral hygiene habits, please contact Dr. Williams at Dedicated Dental Services in Sparkill, NY, serving Sparkill, Old Tappan, Tappan, Blauvelt, Piermont, Nyack, South Nyack, Palisades, Norwood, and Orangeburg, NY.

By Dedicated Dental Services, PC
March 20, 2018
Category: Oral Health

Preventative dentistry deals with the preservation of healthy gums and teeth and the prevention of oral and dental diseases. This is preventative dentistryaccomplished through good dental hygiene and maintenance practices.Dr. Thomas Williams at Dedicated Dental Services, which is located in Sparkill, NY, offers a full range of dental services. Find out why preventative care is so important.

Enjoy a Healthy Smile

By practicing good dental hygiene at home and visiting your dentist every six months, you can help keep your teeth and gums healthy for a lifetime. It is important that dental hygiene is carried out on a daily basis to enable prevention of oral and dental diseases. By seeing your dentist regularly, you will catch problems early, when they are more easily treatable. 

Prevent Cavities

Cavities are the destruction of the hard, outer layer of your teeth. Untreated cavities can cause infection, tooth pain and tooth loss. You can prevent cavities by flossing daily, brushing at least twice a day, and getting professional dental cleanings.

Prevent Dental Diseases

During a dental exam, your dentist will clean your teeth and check for tooth decay and gum disease. Your dentist will also check your bite and jaw for problems. Your dentist may also conduct an oral cancer screening during your dental exam. Early diagnosis of oral cancer could save your life.

Want a better life? Start with your smile. Call Dedicated Dental Services at 845-359-0288 today to schedule a dental consultation in Sparkill, NY. Your oral hygiene routine and professional dental care are more than just taking care of your smile. They're important steps in taking care of yourself.

By Dedicated Dental Services, PC
March 10, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease  
PeriodontalProbingIncreasesAccuracyinDiagnosingGumDisease

If you’re over age 30 there’s a fifty percent chance you have periodontal (gum) disease—and you may not even know it. Without treatment this often “silent” bacterial infection could cause you to lose gum coverage, supporting bone volume or eventually your teeth.

That’s not to say there can’t be noticeable symptoms like swollen, red, bleeding or painful gums. But the surest way to know if you have gum disease, as well as how advanced it is, is to have us examine your gums with manual probing below the gum line.

Using a long metal device called a periodontal probe, we can detect if you’ve developed periodontal pockets. These are gaps created when the diseased gum’s attachment to teeth has weakened and begun to pull away. The increased void may become inflamed (swollen) and filled with infection.

During an exam we insert the probe, which has markings indicating depths in millimeters, into the naturally occurring space between tooth and gums called the sulcus. Normally, the sulcus extends only about 1-3 mm deep, so being able to probe deeper is a sign of a periodontal pocket. How deep we can probe can also tell us about the extent of the infection: if we can probe to 5 mm, you may have early to mild gum disease; 5-7 mm indicates moderate gum disease; and anything deeper is a sign of advanced disease.

Knowing periodontal pocket depth helps guide our treatment strategy. Our main goal is to remove bacterial plaque, a thin film of food particles that collects on teeth and is the main cause and continuing fuel for the infection. In mild to moderate cases this may only require the use of hand instruments called scalers to manually remove plaque from tooth surfaces.

If, however, our periodontal probing indicates deeper, advanced gum disease, we may need to include surgical procedures to access these infected areas through the gum tissue. By knowing the depth and extent of any periodontal pockets, we can determine whether or not to use these more invasive techniques.

Like many other health conditions, discovering gum disease early could help you avoid these more advanced procedures and limit the damage caused by the infection. Besides daily brushing and flossing to remove plaque and regular dental checkups, keep watch for signs of swollen or bleeding gums and contact us for an appointment as soon as possible. And be aware that if you smoke, your gums will not likely bleed or swell—that could make diagnosis more difficult.

If you would like more information on treating gum disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor article “Understanding Periodontal Pockets.”

By Dedicated Dental Services, PC
February 08, 2018
Category: Oral Health
HowBigBangTheoryActressMayimBialikGetsHerKidstoFloss

How many actresses have portrayed a neuroscientist on a wildly successful TV comedy while actually holding an advanced degree in neuroscience? As far as we know, exactly one: Mayim Bialik, who plays the lovably geeky Amy Farrah Fowler on CBS' The Big Bang Theory… and earned her PhD from UCLA.

Acknowledging her nerdy side, Bialik recently told Dear Doctor magazine, “I'm different, and I can't not be different.” Yet when it comes to her family's oral health, she wants the same things we all want: good checkups and great-looking smiles. “We're big on teeth and oral care,” she said. “Flossing is really a pleasure in our house.”

How does she get her two young sons to do it?

Bialik uses convenient pre-loaded floss holders that come complete with floss and a handle. “I just keep them in a little glass right next to the toothbrushes so they're open, no one has to reach, they're just right there,” she said. “It's really become such a routine, I don't even have to ask them anymore.”

As many parents have discovered, establishing healthy routines is one of the best things you can do to maintain your family's oral health. Here are some other oral hygiene tips you can try at home:

Brush to the music — Plenty of pop songs are about two minutes long… and that's the length of time you should brush your teeth. If brushing in silence gets boring, add a soundtrack. When the music's over — you're done!

Flossing can be fun — If standard dental floss doesn't appeal, there are many different styles of floss holders, from functional ones to cartoon characters… even some with a martial-arts theme! Find the one that your kids like best, and encourage them to use it.

The eyes don't lie — To show your kids how well (or not) they are cleaning their teeth, try using an over-the-counter disclosing solution. This harmless product will temporarily stain any plaque or debris that got left behind after brushing, so they can immediately see where they missed, and how to improve their hygiene technique — which will lead to better health.

Have regular dental exams & cleanings — When kids see you're enthusiastic about going to the dental office, it helps them feel the same way… and afterward, you can point out how great it feels to have a clean, sparkling smile.

For more information about oral hygiene, please contact our office or schedule a consultation. You can read the interview with Mayim Bialik in the latest issue of Dear Doctor magazine.

By Dedicated Dental Services, PC
January 02, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease   oral health  
IsThereaLinkBetweenGumDiseaseandCardiovascularHealth

Is there a link between periodontal (gum) disease and cardiovascular disease? Medical researchers are endeavoring to answer this intriguing question, but early findings seem to say yes. If it bears true, the findings could advance treatment for both diseases.

There is one thing that can be said for certain: inflammation is a factor in both diseases’ progression. Gum disease begins as an infection caused by bacteria growing in plaque, which is made up of bacteria and a thin film of food remnant that adheres to tooth surfaces. The body responds to this infection through tissue inflammation, an attempt to prevent the infection from spreading. Likewise, inflammation appears to be a similar response to changes in blood vessels afflicted by cardiovascular disease.

While inflammation is part of the body’s mechanism to heal traumatized tissue, if it becomes chronic it can actually have a damaging effect on the tissues intended to benefit. For patients with gum disease, chronic inflammation causes connective tissues to detach from teeth, leading eventually to tooth and bone loss. Similarly, inflammation damages the linings of blood vessels in cardiovascular disease patients.

Researchers want to know what role bacteria may also play in the progression of cardiovascular disease. Initial studies seem to indicate that proactively treating the gum disease by removing all plaque from oral surfaces in patients with both conditions does appear to improve the health of diseased blood vessel linings. Whether this could ultimately reduce the occurrence of heart attack or stroke still needs to be ascertained.

As we learn more about the possible connections between these two diseases, there’s hope it will lead to new advancements that could improve health outcomes for both. It may prove to be the case, then, that maintaining a healthy mouth promotes a healthy heart, and vice-versa.

If you would like more information on the connection between gum disease and heart disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Periodontal Inflammation and Heart Disease.”